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Lateral medullary syndrome journal

A 65-year-old white man diagnosed with right superior lateral medullary syndrome first presented for assessment of dysphagia 12 weeks after the initial neurological event.During this 12-week period, the patient underwent a stormy course with aspiration pneumonia requiring a tracheostomy and insertion of a percutaneous gastrostomy tube.On examination, the typical neurological findings of. Lateral medullary syndrome, also known as posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome, or Wallenberg's syndrome, is one of the best recognized among the several syndromes of brainstem strokes

Lateral medullary syndrome (LMS), also called Wallenberg syndrome or posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome results from a vascular event in the lateral part of the medulla oblongata. It was named after Adolf Wallenberg (1862-1949), who was a renowned Jewish neurologist and neuroanatomist who practiced in Germany Lateral medullary syndrome is one of the commonest clinical encountered brainstem syndromes. The usual cause is occlusion of penetrating branch of distal vertebral artery from steno-occlusive disease Dorsolateral medullary syndrome of Wallenberg's syndrome, also known as 'posterior cerebellar artery syndrome' or 'lateral medullary syndrome', is the commonest of the brain stem strokes (Figure 2 a,b) with the middle medulla most frequently affected. 10 The syndrome results from spino- and trigemino-thalamic systems injury with sparing of the lemniscal pathways and is characterized by vertigo, ipsilateral hemiataxia, dysarthria, ptosis, miosis and homolateral HS rior lateral medullary syndrome first presented for assessment of dysphagia 12 weeks after the initial neurological event. During this 12-week period, the patient underwent a stormy course with aspiration pneumonia requiring a tracheostomy and insertion of a percutaneous gastrostomy tube. On exami The lesions tended to produce classic lateral medullary syndrome (for example, 5 patients had a classic crossed sensory pattern). Presumed Pathogenesis Six patients had atherothrombosis, 2 had arterial dissection (1 probable and 1 possible), and 1 had an embolism of unknown source

We describe the acute and long-term prognosis in 43 patients with lateral medullary infarction (LMI) collected from a population-based stroke registry from 1982 to July 1988. Mean age was 63.9 years and median time of follow-up was 33 months. In the acute phase, 5 patients (11.6%) died from respiratory and cardiovascular complications and 2 new strokes occurred, both in the posterior circulation A hiccup is a rare symptom in lateral medullary syndrome (Wallenberg's Syndrome). The lateral medullary syndrome is an uncommon form of stroke. A 52 years old male smoker patient presented with history of sudden onset hiccups, dysphagia, vertigo and hoarseness of voice. He was diagnosed as a case of lateral medullary syndrome

Lateral medullary infarction (LMI) has a well-defined clinical syndrome and vascular pathology. The functional outcome and degree of disability of patients with LMI, however, have not been as well investigated. We followed 18 consecutive patients with LMI during inpatient stroke rehabilitation. Thirteen patients were followed after discharge from the hospital over a mean time of 1 year A provisional diagnosis of right sided lateral medullary syndrome was made. Unusually in this case, the contralateral half of face was involved. This may be due to involvement of the contralateral trigeminothalamic tract that crosses the side of the lesion within the dorsal medulla

Video: Wallenberg Syndrome - PubMe

Wallenberg syndrome. Zhenisa Hysenaj, MD , Razia Rehmani, MD. Key Points: Lateral medullary syndrome is most commonly due to occlusion of the intracranial portion of the vertebral artery followed by PICA and its branches. 20% of ischemic strokes occur in the posterior circulation. Hypertension is the most common risk factor Background: Lateral medullary (Wallenberg) syndrome is the most common stroke syndrome related to vertebralartery disease. The hallmark of this syndrome is crossed sensory findings affecting the contralateral trunk andextremities and the ipsilateral side of the face. This is in addition to dysarthria, dysphagia, vertigo, and Horner'ssyndrome. Unilateral vocal cord dysfunction is frequently seen, but bilateral vocal cord paralysis is an extremely rareand potentially life threatening complication Angiographic Findings in Wallenberg's Lateral Medullary Syndrome published on Dec 1962 by Journal of Neurosurgery Publishing Group Lateral medul lary syndrome is a constell ation of neurologica l defici ts due t o a lesion in t he lateral pa rt of the m edul la of the c entra l nerv ou

Lateral medullary syndrome is a rare cause of stroke. Generally, lesions are related to multiple vessel involvement, dissection, and poor collateral circulation is larger than those associated with single-vessel disease, atherothrombosis/cardiac embolism, and good collateralization. As seen in our case, hiccups might be one of signs and symptoms. The disease can be diagnosed clinically. Imaging (Head CT/MRI) can be used to confirm diagnose. There isn't a specific treatment Introduction. The loss of pain and temperature sensation in ipsilateral face and contralateral body (crossed pattern) in lateral medullary syndrome is well recognized and has been referred to as type I sensory loss of Stopford classification.1, 2 It occurs due to far lateral infarctions of the medulla. Sensory loss on the contralateral face, arm, trunk and leg (pure sensory stroke pattern) in.

A case of bilateral stroke of the medulla oblongata

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Wallenberg Syndrome (aka Lateral Medullary Syndrome or Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Syndrome) is a neurological condition caused by a blockage of the vertebral artery (VA) or posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA), ultimately leading to infarction of the lateral medulla Lateral medullary syndrome (LMS) is a well-recognized vascular syndrome of the vertebrobasilar territory. Classically, sensory dysfunction in LMS is characterized by the dissociated involvement of the spinothalamic sensory modalities (impairment of pain and thermal sensation over the contralateral hemibody/limbs and over the ipsilateral face. medullary infarction; sensory patterns of stroke; stroke; Loss of pain and temperature sensation due to lateral medullary infarction are well known.1-5 They classically involve the ipsilateral side of the face and the lower part of the body on the contralateral side, corresponding to far lateral medullary lesions (crossed type) or the type I sensory loss of Stopford's classification.3 More. Lateral medullary syndrome (Wallenberg syndrome) is an acute ischemic infarct due to occlusion of the vessels supplying the lateral medulla oblongata. Most commonly occlusion is intracranial portion of the vertebral artery or posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and/or its branches. The lateral medullary syndrome was described in 1808 b

Several reported cases of brainstem stroke followed neck manipulation or trauma. We describe a 28-year-old man who had a lateral medullary syndrome after cervical hyperextension in an automobile accident. Angiography revealed complete occlusion of the left vertebral artery KEY WORDS: Evidence-based practice • Lateral medullary syndrome • Task-oriented approach • Wallenberg syndrome This case report describes the application of evidence-based occupational therapy interventions focussed on improving the activities of daily living performance of a 73-year-old male, who was recovering from Wallenberg syndrome Pseudothalamic pattern of sensory loss in lateral medullary syndrome- A clinicoanatomic correlation - IJN- Print ISSN No: - 2581-8236 Online ISSN No:- 2581-916X Article DOI No:- 10.18231/j.ijn.2020.053, IP Indian Journal of Neurosciences-IP Indian J Neurosc Background: Dysphagia is a common consequence of medullary stroke, and it is particularly true in Lateral medullary syndrome (LMS).Aims: To compare the lateral medullary syndrome (LMS) to the middle cerebral artery infarct (MCA) population to study the swallowing dysfunction at the oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal level using flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and video.

An Evidence-based Practice for the Treatment of Lateral

Neuroimaging HINTS of the Lateral Medullary Syndrome

Brainstem strokes have been reported following neck trauma and manipulation, but never previously reported following basilar artery migraine. We describe a 21-year-old man who suffered a lateral medullary syndrome associated with basilar artery migraines. Angiography revealed complete occlusion of the left vertebral artery We report the acute onset of lateral medullary syndrome (Wallenberg's syndrome) in a 6-year-old boy 32 days after a primary varicella infection. Although Wallenberg's syndrome is the most common brain-stem complica. Left, Magnetic resonance imaging, approximately 5 weeks after the varicella infection Therapeutic role of rTMS on recovery of dysphagia in patients with lateral medullary syndrome and brainstem infarction. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, & Psychiatry , 81, 495-499. Crossref Medline Google Schola Lateral medullary syndrome (LMS) or Wallenberg's syndrome (WS) is caused by a vascular event in the territory of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery or the vertebral artery . In this report, we present a case of Wallenberg syndrome treated in our institute and we discuss its pathological and clinical features and review the related literature Conclusion: Brown-Séquard syndrome-like manifestation can be a rare presentation of lower lateral medullary infarction. Key Words:Brown-Séquard syndrome, cerebrovascular disease, lateral medullary infarction. Acta Neurol Taiwan 2010;19:204-207 INTRODUCTION Lateral medullary infarction (LMI), also known as Wallenberg syndrome or Viesseaux.

Hajdu—Cheney syndrome and syringomyelia in: Journal of

Dysphagia in a patient with lateral medullary syndrome

  1. Strokes involving the lateral medulla can rarely produce a central hypoventilation syndrome (CHS) characterized by loss of automatic respiration called Ondine's curse. In this study, we investigated the neuroanatomical correlates of CHS in patients with lateral medullary infarction (LMI)
  2. Wallenberg syndrome, also known as lateral medullary syndrome or posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) syndrome, is the most prevalent posterior ischemic stroke syndrome. Named after Adolf Wallenberg in 1895, this neurological condition is characterized by lateral medullary infarction resulting from an occlusion of the.
  3. Lateral medullary, or Wallenberg's, syndrome is defined as a neurological condition due to a stroke in the vertebral or posterior inferior cerebellar artery of the brain stem . Symptoms may include difficulty of swallowing, dizziness, nausea and vomiting, decreased pain and temperature sensation on one side of the face and opposite side of.
  4. We describe two cases of lateral medullary syndrome at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica. This diagnosis is often missed and not well understood, so we will discuss the underlying pathophysiology
  5. Introduction. Wallenberg syndrome (WS) is well defined clinically, and lateral medullary infarction (LMI) is one of its most frequent causes. Although the combinations of the various signs and symptoms are helpful for the clinical diagnosis of WS, the presence of the different signs and symptoms may vary from patient to patient.1 2 Among these symptoms and signs, dysphagia has been reported in.
  6. DOI: 10.1097/00000539-200211000-00065 Corpus ID: 44260147. Lateral medullary syndrome after prone position for general surgery. @article{Chu2002LateralMS, title={Lateral medullary syndrome after prone position for general surgery.}, author={Y. Chu and S. Tsai and Kwok-Hon Chan and S. Kao and Ching-Huang Liang and S. Lin}, journal={Anesthesia and analgesia}, year={2002}, volume={95 5}, pages.

Lateral Medullary Syndrome After Prone Position for

  1. Abstract. Background Diagnosis of lateral medullary syndrome (LMS) is often delayed due to elusive clinical presentations and frequently non-revealing neuroimaging tests. We aimed to investigate.
  2. Wallenberg syndrome, also known as lateral medullary syndrome or Wallenberg's syndrome, is a condition that affects the nervous system. It's often caused by a stroke in the brain stem — the.
  3. Lateral medullary syndrome or Wallenberg syndrome is an interesting clinical entity with varied presentations. Its clinical features include ipsilateral... DOAJ is a community-curated online directory that indexes and provides access to high quality, open access, peer-reviewed journals
  4. Discussion. Lateral medullary syndrome is a rare cause of stroke [].Generally, lesions are related to multiple vessel involvement, dissection, and poor collateral circulation is larger than those associated with single-vessel disease, atherothrombosis/cardiac embolism, and good collateralization [].As seen in our case, hiccups might be one of signs and symptoms
  5. ished gag reflex. Ipsilateral Horner syndrome. Nausea, diplopia, patient that is falling to the ipsilateral side, nystagmus, vertigo
  6. Hye Yoon Chung, Bang-Hoon Cho, Kyung-Yul Lee, Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Transient Symptoms of Lateral Medullary Syndrome, Journal of Neurosonology and Neuroimaging, 10.31728/jnn.2018.00014, 10, 2, (151-153), (2018)

Lateral Medullary Syndrome Article - StatPearl

Lateral medullary syndrome is associated with ipsipulsion (17, 19), whereas midbrain lesions are associated with contrapulsion. There are two forms of lateropulsion. The first is a bias of static eye position in the absence of visual fixation. This is revealed as a deviation of the eyes in darkness or with the eyes closed Abstract. Objectives: To analyse the clinical characteristic of Lateral Medullary Syndrome (LMS) with Ondine's curse. Materials and Methods: This is a report of 3 cases of LMS with Ondine's curse. Characteristics and clinical presentations of three patients were described and analysed. Results: All patients were male and they were 63, 65 and 84 y old respectively J. Neurovirol. (2012) 18:538-540 DOI 10.1007/s13365-012-0132-z CASE REPORT Varicella zoster vasculopathy presenting as lateral medullary syndrome Deepti Vibha & Sudesh Prabhakar & Dheeraj Khurana & Niranjan Khandelwal Received: 16 July 2012 /Revised: 18 September 2012 /Accepted: 28 September 2012 /Published online: 16 October 2012 Journal of NeuroVirology, Inc. 2012 Introduction chest for 7. Read Lateral Medullary Syndrome After Basilar Migraine, Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips The doctor told me that this type of stroke caused Wallenberg's Syndrome or Lateral Medullary Syndrome As it turns out I am almost a textbook case. While I was in the neurological unit I learned that I had lost heat and prick sensation on my right side of my face and the left side of my body

Fine margin between crossed sensory and contralateral

Journal of Neurological Sciences 155 (1998) 55-59 Sympathetic skin response in patients with lateral medullary syndrome ´ Vıctor Obach, Josep Valls-Sole´ *, Nicolas ´ Vila, Luis Ernesto Gonzalez, ´ Angel Chamorro ´ , Universitat de Barcelona, Villarroel 170, 08036 Barcelona, Spain Unitat d' EMG, Servei de Neurologia We describe two cases of lateral medullary syndrome at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica. This diagnosis is often missed and not well understood, so we will discuss the underlying pathophysiology. West Indian Medical Journal Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston 7 Tel: (876. Abstract. Four patients with a clinical diagnosis of Wallenberg's lateral medullary syndrome were studied with both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and cranial Computed Tomography (CT). Using transverse images and both T1 and T2 — weighted sequences, MRI demonstrated a medullary infarction not seen on CT in all four cases

Wallenberg Syndrome MRI

Stroke syndromes and clinical management QJM: An

Methods. A retrospective, observer-blinded study of horizontal conjugate eye deviation was performed in 1) 50 consecutive patients [age 58±15 years (mean±SD), 74% male, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 2±1] with acute unilateral lateral medullary infarction as seen in MRI (infarction group), 2) 54 patients with transient brainstem symptoms [transient ischemic attack of brainstem. Background: Besides the typical alternate clinical picture, Wallenberg syndrome may be rarely associated with facial pain due to the involvement of the trigeminal nucleus, and sudden death. Case: We report a case of lateral medullary infarction associated with potentially life threatening intermittent high degree atrioventricular block which occurred in close temporally association with severe.

Dysphagia in a Patient With Lateral Medullary Syndrome

  1. Here we describe a patient with a lateral medullary infarction who experienced symptomatic hyponatremia with finding suggestive of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone followed by cerebral salt wasting syndrome.Case presentation: A 70-year-old Korean man visited emergency room complaining of sudden onset vertigo and gait.
  2. We report a patient who developed conjugate horizontal gaze deviation and ipsipulsion of saccades from a lateral medullary infarction. Recent evidence suggests that the gaze deviation may result from increased inhibition of the ipsilateral vestibular nucleus and ipsipulsion of sac-cades from decreased excitation of the contralateral ocular premotor areas of the brainstem reticular formation
  3. ation of a 61-year-old man with an acute vestibular syndrome (AVS) and left LMS who died 3 weeks after the stroke. Postmortem brainstem analysis was performed. Results: The stroke involved the lateral medulla and pontomedullary junction, near the MVN, sparing the cerebellum and pons
  4. Wallenberg's Lateral Medullary Syndrome: Clinical-Magnetic Resonance Imaging Correlations Ralph L. Sacco, Lorenza Freddo, Jacqueline A. Bello , Jeffrey G. Odel, Stephen T. Onesti, J. P. Mohr Research output : Contribution to journal › Article › peer-revie
  5. Name of syndrome. I've attempted to edit all references to the syndrome with lateral medullary syndrome since that is the name of the article. I'm too inexperienced on Wikipedia to know if there are some problems with re-directing of this page, but I think maybe there are. Thanks for any help. Mseliw 13:21, 20 May 2007 (UTC) ENPH 45

Patterns of Lateral Medullary Infarction Strok

Lateral-medullary-syndrome Symptom Checker: Possible causes include Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Occlusion. Check the full list of possible causes and conditions now! Talk to our Chatbot to narrow down your search Wallenberg syndrome is a condition that affects the nervous system. Signs and symptoms may include swallowing difficulties, dizziness, hoarseness, nausea and vomiting, nystagmus, and problems with balance.Some people have uncontrollable hiccups, loss of pain and temperature sensation on one side of the face, and/or weakness or numbness on one side of the body Raymond-Céstan syndrome is caused by blockage of the long circumferential branches of the basilar artery. It was described by Fulgence Raymond and Étienne Jacques Marie Raymond Céstan. Along with other related syndromes such as Millard-Gubler syndrome, Foville's syndrome, and Weber's syndrome, the description was instrumental in establishing important principles in brain-stem localization Lateral medullary syndrome is a conglomeration of symptoms suggestive of tract involvement at the level of lateral medulla, with classic clinical findings. We report an 82-year-old male with lateral medullary syndrome who developed acute stridor secondary to bilateral vocal cord palsy

Retro-ocular headache with autonomic features resembling

Lateral medullary infarction Neurolog

Wallenberg's lateral medullary syndrome. S Jain, A Gupta, and N Agarwal. Department of Medicine, Lady Hardinge Medical College, and Dr Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, New Delhi, India 1. INTRODUCTION. Lateral medullary syndrome, also known as Wallenberg's syndrome (WS), is caused by an infarction of a wedge of the dorsal lateral medulla oblongata that results from an occlusion of the vertebral artery or posterior inferior cerebellar artery (Kim, 2003; Kameda et al., 2004).Clinical symptoms of WS include hoarseness and dysphagia, dissociated sensory disturbance, vertigo. Lateral medullary syndrome is a well-defined posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarct characterized by ipsilateral palatal palsy and contralateral sensory loss. A variety of eye movement abnormalities are associated with lateral medullary syndrome that includes skew deviation, primary position horizontal/torsional/upbeat nystagmus, gaze. The case study is aimed at providing a more thorough analysis of a case of lateral medullary syn-drome presented only with persistent hiccup after eating lunch the study hopes to generate an interest for further studies into the topic and focuses on abnormal unusual presentations of lateral medullary syndrome. Ethical committee has approved this case after taking consent from the patient and.

Recovery following lateral medullary infarction Neurolog

A 39-year-old woman presented with vertigo and difficulty controlling her right side. She had a right-sided Horner's syndrome, gaze-evoked horizontal nystagmus with the fast-beating phase to the left, and right upper and lower limb ataxia with reduced temperature sensation to the left side of her face, arm and leg. MR scan of brain showed a right lateral medullary infarct secondary to a. Lateral medullary infarction rarely leads to central hypoventilation syndrome (CHS). CHS is a life-threatening disorder characterized by hypoventilation during sleep. We report the first case of CHS as a complication of lateral medullary infarction after endovascular treatment. A 65-year-old man presented twice with severe headache 1. Albert F Peterman, Robert G Siekert (1960) The Lateral Medullary (Wallenberg) Syndrome: Clinical Features and Prognosis. Medical Clinics of North America 44(4): 887-896. 2. Carlos M Ordás, María L Cuadrado, Patricia Simal, Raúl Barahona, Javier Casas, et al. (2011) Wallenberg's syndrome and symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia Symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia due to a brainstem infarction is said to be rare. However, facial pain is not uncommon in Wallenberg's syndrome. Facial pain related to a Wallenberg's syndrome may be either persistent of intermittent, and occasionally occurs in brief attacks. Here, we report a patient with a right lateral medullary infarction who started having first division trigeminal. Methods: Clinico- pathologic examination of a 61 year-old man with an acute vestibular syndrome (AVS) and left LMS who died 3 weeks after the stroke. Post-mortem brainstem analysis was performed. Results: The stroke involved the lateral medulla and ponto-medullary junction, near the MVN, sparing the cerebellum and pons

Wallenberg's lateral medullary syndrome Postgraduate

  1. The dorso-lateral medullary syndrome (Wallenberg's syndrome) is produced by infarction of a wedge of lateral medulla posterior to the inferior olivary nucleus and is usually caused by vertebral artery occlusion. Ipsilateral axial lateropulsion as an initial symptom of vertebral artery occlusion is rather rare and the anatomical structure responsible is still uncertain
  2. Background: Lateral medullary stroke (LMS) results in a characteristic pattern of brainstem signs including ocular motor and vestibular deficits. Thus, an impaired angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) may be found if the vestibular nuclei are affected.Objective: We aimed to characterize the frequency and pattern of vestibular and ocular-motor deficits in patients with LMS.Methods: Patients.
  3. Lateral medullary syndrome. The lateral medullary syndrome (Wallenberg's syndrome) is most often caused by occlusion of the intracranial segment of the vertebral artery (VA), less commonly; it is caused by occlusion of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). The syndrome is characterized by sensory deficit
  4. al neuralgia (TN) is caused by a demonstrable structural lesion other than vascular com-pression, typically posterior fossa tumors or multiple sclerosis [1, 2]. TN due to a brainstem infarction is con-sidered to be rare. Yet, Wallenberg.
  5. The case study is aimed at providing a more thorough analysis of a case of lateral medullary syndrome presented only with persistent hiccup after eating lunch the study hopes to generate an interest for further studies into the topic and focuses on abnorm\ al unusual presentations of lateral medullary syndrome
  6. Lateral medullary syndrome causing Ondine's curse is a rare yet fatal brainstem infarction. Any patient presenting with lateral medulla infarction ought to be well observed and a polysomnography must be ordered for him. A patient presenting with Ondine's curse is dealt with through polysomnography as a diagnostic procedure that was followed by tracheostomy with portable ventilator and.

Wallenberg syndrome - The New York Medical Journa

  1. Hemi-infarction of the medulla causes the clinical constellation of symptoms and signs of both the lateral and medial medullary syndromes and nearly always results from occlusion of an intracranial vertebral artery. In the case reported here, with a clinical diagnosis of hemimedullary syndrome, the expected infarction was imaged by magnetic resonance
  2. Lateral medullary syndrome (Wallenberg's syndrome) - A case report. Faridpur Medical College Journal, 5(1), 35-36. Anton-Babinski Syndrome •Symptoms: cortical blindness but unaware, confabulation •Primary cause: bilateral infarction of the posterior cerebral arter
  3. Wallenberg syndrome which is also known as lateral medullary syndrome (LMS) and posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome ((PICA syndrome) is detected relatively rarely among young adults. A 42-year-old apparently healthy male presented with headache, vomiting and vertigo. He was diagnosed to have severe hypertension and type-2 diabetes.
  4. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article › peer-review 子瑜李 1996, ' MR Assessment of Lateral Medullary Syndrome ', 中華放射線醫學雜誌 , vol. 21, no. 2. 子瑜李
  5. al and vagal nerve dysfunction : Case report. / Dahdaleh, Nader S.; Menezes, Arnold H. In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics, Vol. 2, No. 4, 01.10.2008, p. 250-253. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article › peer.
  6. Wallenberg's Lateral Medullary Syndrome: Clinical-Magnetic Resonance Imaging Correlations Ralph L. Sacco , Lorenza Freddo, Jacqueline A. Bello, Jeffrey G. Odel, Stephen T. Onesti, J. P. Mohr Research output : Contribution to journal › Article › peer-revie
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Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Restricted dissociated sensory loss in a patient with a lateral medullary syndrome: A clinical-MRI study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint. Lateral Medullary Syndrome Medicine & Life Science Secondary cervical dystonia is induced by organic brain lesions involving the basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, and brain stem. It is extremely rare to see cervical dystonia induced by a medullary lesion. We report a case of an 86-year-old Japanese woman who developed cervical dystonia following lateral medullary infarction. She developed sudden-onset left upper and lower extremity weakness. Trigeminal trophic syndrome, a rare complication of lateral medullary syndrome, results from a painless trauma to the face. 1 Awareness of the neurological basis of the syndrome avoids inappropriate interventions. The treatment hinges on avoiding further trauma (cutting finger nails, nocturnal scratch mittens, protective facial prosthetics) and.